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Traffic Cones - What Color Do I Use?

Traffic Cones - What Color Do I Use?

Mr. Chain has been selling colored traffic cones for a few years now. Besides the fact that traffic cones fit clearly within our goal to provide solutions to any and all safety and crowd control challenges, we offer traffic cones in kits with our patented Cone Chain Connector (C3) and plastic chain. This is such an economical and effective way to connect traffic cones to create visual barriers.

Although we manufacture the Cone Chain Connector and the plastic chain, we buy the traffic cones from JBC Safety http://www.jbcsafetyplastic.com/Product/detail/1.

When we first started offering traffic cones, we only offered Traffic Orange and Safety Green, with and without a reflective collar. These have proved to be so popular that we added Traffic Blue, White and Yellow traffic cones. And, now, for 2020, we are again adding more colors, Green, Safety Pink and Sky Blue. For every traffic cone color, we are offering matching Cone Chain Connectors and plastic chain. The most popular height for traffic cones is 28 inches, but we also offer 36 inch high traffic cones in several colors.

We thought people might wonder where and when to use each color traffic cone. Some of the safety colors are specifically designated by OSHA to be used in certain situations. The colors are aligned with the level of danger, and the colors that are included in the “safety” spectrum are red, orange, yellow, green, dark blue, and white.

According to OSHA, this is what each safety color means (listed from highest degree of danger to least):

1.) Red Traffic Cones = Danger. For OSHA, red connotes imminent danger with the chance of serious injury or death.

2.) Traffic Orange Traffic Cones = Warning. The color orange means there is a potential danger of serious injury or death.

3.) Yellow Traffic Cones = Caution. Yellow also portends potential danger, but, according to OSHA, the risk is lessened to general injury.

4.) Kelly Green Traffic Cones = Safety Equipment. OSHA has assigned green to first-aid stations that feature emergency information, eye wash or other safety equipment. Green is also commonly used at athletic events, especially track and field.

5.) Dark Blue Traffic Cones = Notice. OSHA uses blue to denote important information that is non-hazardous. Blue is also used to designate Handicapped-only spaces.

6.) White Traffic Cones = Safe. White marks areas that are considered safe. White is also a good backdrop for logos, or to indicate the location of entrances, restrooms, etc.

    Additional traffic cone colors are also available. These do not carry any OSHA designation, but over years of usage, the colors do carry a special meaning.

    1.) Safety Pink Traffic Cones. Most people immediately recognize Safety Pink as the global designated color of the breast cancer walks. Again, we make chain cone connectors and plastic chain to exactly match the pink traffic cones.

    2.) Safety Green Traffic Cones. These are also called lime green, and they are a cross between yellow and green. Even though this color is not specifically designated by OSHA as a safety color, these traffic cones match the safety vest that many highway and construction workers wear. Safety Green is a color that is very visible to the human eye.

    3.) Sky Blue Traffic Cones. Sky Blue does not have a common meaning, but it is a vibrant color that could be used for parties, corporate events, and would be attractive at a baby shower.

      Whatever color you decide works for your situation, Mr. Chain has the traffic cones, Cone Chain Connector, and plastic chain to accomplish your goal. If you need assistance or have any other questions, please reach out to us at support@mrchain.com or 800-324-5861.

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